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Acceptance by Ivies doesn’t remove stigma

George Curry | 4/14/2014, 11:26 a.m.
You would think that news of a high school student from a family of African immigrants getting accepted into all ...
George E. Curry, former editor-in-chief of Emerge magazine, is editor-in-chief of the National Newspaper Publishers Association News Service. He is a keynote speaker, moderator and media coach. Curry can be reached through his website, http://www.georgecurry.com. You can also follow him at http://www.twitter.com/currygeorge.

“For example 10 people from my high school applied to Stanford and the only one who got in had a 3.5 GPA (lowest of the 10) and a 2030 SAT (lowest of the 10) and he was in my class struggling mightily.”

Comeonreally8 wrote, “I am an admissions interviewer for one of the top ivies and I see a HUGE number of minority applicants with top grades, great SATs, and great leadership in their extracurriculars and they are rejected just as often as the non-minority applicants. So everyone saying ‘OMG IT’S ONLY BECAUSE HE’S BLACK’ calm down, being a minority is not some free pass to get into college. It is still incredibly challenging and rare to get into the top ivies. This kid sounds brilliant and I wish him all the success.”

Wrote retop56: “This comment section is nothing short of hilarious. Yes, schools look for diversity in admissions, but it seems like a lot of people really think he did nothing except check a box that he’s black and waltz into 8 Ivys.”

One person wrote, “There are 1000s of spots for white students to get in but when they fail to do so, they blame it on the 50 black students that they let in every year.”

A White writer, JadeChaosTheory, noted: “Just by being white we have a ton of advantages in general – minorities need the boosts where they can get it.”

He explained, “He [Enin] could graduate college with flying colors and still struggle to find a job/move up in the workplace because casual racism is a real and prevalent thing and there is an innate fear of people of color in positions of power.”

George E. Curry, former editor-in-chief of Emerge magazine, is editor-in-chief of the National Newspaper Publishers Association News Service. He is a keynote speaker, moderator and media coach. Curry can be reached through http://www.georgecurry.com.