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Megacommunities bridge STEM gap

Freddie Allen | 4/28/2014, 8:42 a.m.
In an effort to address persistent racial disparities in science and engineering careers, educators and community stakeholders have embraced the ...
Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who also published research focused on science and math education and minority participation and performance, speaks during a health care summit at Howard University in Washington, D.C. Photos by Freddie Allen

Buchanan continued: “The megacommunity allows you to bring all of those things to the table and say, ‘what do you want to accomplish and identify members that can fill those gaps. We all need future doctors and nurses and engineers and we’re going all the way over to India and Africa and we’re having those kids come over to our schools.”

Making those investments in education at home and tapping resources found domestically is a much better long-term solution to the problem and a win-win-win for public, private and non-profit groups, Buchanan said.

“The fact is that whether we’re talking about whether someone lives or dies, whether we’re talking about whether we can find a cure for cancer, whether we’re talking about whether we can protect our country, whether we’re talking about what do with the environment and global warming even when we’re talking about our quality of life every day there is some connection to what we call ‘STEM,’” said Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who also chairs President Barack Obama’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. “If you’re going to be really good at STEM you have to be really good at the other subjects, too.”