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News 2014 March

Stories for March 2014

Monday, March 31

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Standing on the shoulders of a proud Black feminist

In a world that is dominated by men, especially White men, feminism is, for me, an empowering concept.

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The invisible leaders of social change, civil rights

Women’s History Month is a reminder that in every major American social reform movement, women have always played a critical role

Empowering, uplifting and uniting Black America

Every March the National Newspaper Publishers Association and its philanthropic arm, the NNPA Foundation, gather in Washington, D.C., for Black Press Week.

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Obama worse than Bush on SBA loans

When I interviewed Marie Johns, then the outgoing deputy secretary of the Small Business Administration, a year ago, she said the SBA does not separate figures by race, though it hopes to do so at some point.

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It’s time to grow up: Our eduction system

I have spent the majority of my career in education, either as a classroom teacher or as an educational consultant.

Dedication of the Black Press

Since 1827, the African American community has depended on Black newspapers to tell their stories and provide information relevant to their community.

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Marissa Alexander back on trial in July

Marissa Alexander will stand trial again July 28 for what should never have been considered a crime, much less a conviction, say her supporters.

Black women still penalized for race and gender

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed race- and gender-based discrimination. Now, 50 years later, Black women still suffer under the double-whammy of race and gender.

Thursday, March 27

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The Original Big Mama: Actress Irma P. Hall reflects on 40+ years in drama

“One finger pointing the blame don’t make no impact. But you ball up all them fingers into a fist, and you can strike a mighty blow. This family got to be that fist.” – Big Mama in Soul Food

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Home rule: Dallas ISD in tug-of-war battle

A proposal for Dallas Independent School District to become the first home rule charter district in Texas was sparked by frustration at the district’s low academic performance. However, many are divided as to whether or not home rule is a good fit for Dallas ISD students.

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John Lewis: When we were ‘Colored’

“Blood on the leaves and blood at the root. Black bodies swinging in the Southern breeze. Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees,” a choir soloist sang Billie Holiday’s Strange Fruit during the 11 a.m. service at St. Luke “Community” United Methodist Church.

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Giddings, standing tall in a male-dominated world

In celebration of the accomplishments of African American women during Women’s History Month in March, the African American Museum in Dallas is hosting a lecture series of distinguished Black women who have made a significant contribution to society through their work.

Giddings, standing tall in a male-dominated world

In celebration of the accomplishments of African American women during Women’s History Month in March, the African American Museum in Dallas is hosting a lecture series of distinguished Black women who have made a significant contribution to society through their work.

Thursday, March 20

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Around the State

The St. Philip’s School and Community Center, in partnership with Morning Star Family Foundation, will host its annual Morning Star Lecture Series on Tuesday from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the school’s campus, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Keynote speaker Jennifer C. Stimpson

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Final push to get Blacks signed up for ACA

With less than two weeks left to sign up for insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, grassroots supporters of the mandatory law and federal health officials are rushing to enroll Blacks, other people of color and young people in order to meet the Obama administration’s goal of reaching 7 million people by the end of this month.

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Whistling Dixie: The GOP’s ‘culture of poverty’ gambit

The 2014 mid-term elections are just eight months away – and the Republicans are worried about Black voters again.

Romancing the ‘power to vote,’ ignoring our ‘voting power’

It’s so silly for Black people to fight over the Dems and Repubs when it is counterproductive for us to be enslaved by either party.

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Obama keeps promise to use ‘power of the pen’

During his State of the Union address, President Obama promised to use the power of his pen to achieve the policy objectives that Congress continues to block.

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Devastating impact of tobacco advertising

More than 15 years ago, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the nation’s major cigarette manufacturers for their gross misrepresentation of the hazards of smoking to the public.

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It’s your health

As the March 31 deadline approaches to enroll in health insurance, there are still thousands of Dallas County residents that remain uninsured.

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President Obama’s surprising jobs record

Although unemployment rates are unacceptably high, especially for African Americans, President Obama has done a better job improving the jobless rate than most critics are willing to concede.

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Ben Jealous still pushing technology for equality

Benjamin Todd Jealous, the former NAACP president, who has weaved a career through politics, the Black Press and civil rights, has now announced his next course of action in pursuit of racial equality and economic justice in America.

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The woman who helped to shape Texas’ capital

African American history is riddled with stories of unsung heroes across Texas – men and women who knew that the rewards of the struggle for civil rights would outweigh the consequences of their defiance.

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Are Black Students Worse?

Bias a factor in suspending Black students

A new collection of research shows that despite the myths surrounding Black student behavior, poverty and severity of the offense have very little to do with the rate Black students are suspended from school.

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Black youth now targets of life-threatening epidemic

Striking fear in the hearts of men, even after decades of research and advances, the facts surrounding HIV/AIDS are often engulfed in myths and misconceptions. In 1981, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention formally recognized the deadly epidemic disease known as HIV/AIDS, which shook the nation. Since its discovery, the virus has resulted in the deaths of over 30 million people.

Monday, March 17

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Our Civil Rights in Reflection

Local exhibit offers personal reflections of Civil Rights

The Arthello Beck Gallery, located inside the South Dallas Cultural Center at 3400 S. Fitzhugh Ave., recently wrapped its latest exhibition, “It’s My Right: A Community Reflection on the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.”

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A conversation with Dr. Zan Holmes Jr.

“I remember being a high school student in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1968 when Dr. Zan Holmes was first elected to the Texas Legislature.

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Building on a better STEM education for minorities

With a a $31 million investment in Texas Southern University’s current and future STEM students, the university’s Board of Regents, administrators and faculty officially launched the dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony of it’s Leonard H.O. Spearman Technology Building.

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Around the State

On Saturday, residents of Duck Creek Shopping Center will host Heroes Appreciation Day, to honor local military, police officers, firefighters and veterans from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Liberty Tax office, 5116 N. Jupiter Road, Garland. For more information, call 866-871-1040 or visit http://www.libertytax.com.

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Imagine 2020 initiative coming to life for students

Dallas ISD Superintendent Mike Miles and district officials visited schools in the Imagine 2020 initiative last week to see how the program was taking shape

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Connected City Design Challenge finalists

The Connected City Design Challenge announced last week the finalists for the 2014 Challenge Professional and Open Stream contest

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Roundtable at Capitol Hill address minority women

Over 300 Black women from 10 states traveled to Capitol Hill last week to urge members of Congress to pass policies and programs that help Black and underserved families, especially single mothers and the working poor, during the Black Women’s Roundtable.

Community Conversations: Talking past the politics

“We, the people, recognize that we have responsibilities as well as rights; that our destinies are bound together; that a freedom which only asks what’s in it for me, a freedom without a commitment to others, a freedom without love or charity or duty or patriotism, is unworthy of our founding ideals, and those who died in their defense.” – President Barack Obama

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‘Dead end’ Republican politics exposed

When Darrell Issa, R-Calif., the chairman of the House Oversight Committee, shares more information with conservative Fox News than with Elijah Cummings, D-Md., the ranking Democrat on the committee, that’s enough to make Cummings go ballistic.

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It’s time for us to grow up: Our health

“When I was a child, I thought as a child, I spoke as a child, I acted as a child. But when I grew up I put away childish things.” – First Corinthians 13:11

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Celebrating [Black] Women’s History Month

Do you know about Elizabeth Keckley? Maggie Lena Walker, Sarann Knight Preddy, Gertrude Pocte Geddes-Willis, Trish Millines Dziko, Addie L Wyatt or Marie-Therese Metoyer?

It is time for Blacks in Texas to go to work!

Black Texas – to say nothing of Black America – is at a crossroad that we have never encountered.

Respect begins with us – monitoring our words as well as our actions

"What are we talking about? We talking about fiction or we talking about fact? You talking about fiction? Hold up pardon my back …" – Excerpt from Jay-Z, What We Talking About

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Five days to a fitter, healthier you

If kicking off a life-changing fitness and nutrition program seems daunting, try taking smaller steps to make it feel more manageable.

Monday, March 10

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The Dallas Examiner's Monday Night Community Conversations

It’s not a forum. It’s not a lecture. It’s not a workshop. It’s a conversation with the community regarding issues of concern for the African American community.

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MLK Museum: Dallas’ newest African American museum

“People were not allowed to sit at the counters and be served their food at times,” said Ann Erving, as she read aloud from Child of the Civil Rights Movement to visiting preschool children.

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Monday Night Politics concludes: Education Board candidates, Medicare expansion

“So far, I understand that the numbers for early voting are low,” said Mollie Belt, publisher of The Dallas Examiner, as Monday Night Politics – Meet the Candidates came to a close on Feb. 24.

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Conversation about race, economics

The issue of racism and its impact on economic opportunity was the topic of round two of Conversations about Race, a multi-part discussion with community members and selected panelists, held Feb. 22 in the Dallas City Hall Council Chambers

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Obama signs ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ initiative

No one had seen President Barack Obama more emotional than last week when he announced “My Brother’s Keeper,” a new initiative aimed at helping young Black men.

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Minorities herded into private prisons

Although private schools are often lauded for providing a better education to students, the same can’t be said of private prisons, which house a disproportionate number of people of color, according to a report published in the latest issue of Radical Criminology, an online scholarly journal.

Blacks must vote in every election

The percentage of eligible voters who vote is very small. We don’t know why. We can speculate and analyze about it.

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My sister’s keeper for Black girls

In all the hoopla surrounding President Barack Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative, overlooked is the fact that our young girls also need to be targeted for special attention.

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It’s time to ask: Am I my brother’s keeper?

President Barack Obama last week made a historic announcement to address an issue that has systematically had a devastating impact on a segment of the population in this country.

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Obama’s legacy, will the good outweigh the bad?

President Barack Obama announced “My Brother’s Keeper,” an initiative to help young Black and Brown men succeed.

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Supporting Common Core State Standards – Part I

“You can’t allow 15,000 school boards to home bake their own little standards subject to their own political pressures and think we are going to have international competitiveness. We have to at least have some bare minimum core standards if our young people are going to compete.” – Rep. Bobby Scott, Congressional Black Caucus

Obama’s one-sided responsibility lecture to Black boys

Too often during his presidency, Barack Obama has felt the need to chide Blacks to take responsibility for their destiny.

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Some ‘government workers’ earning CEO wages

The CEOs of some private firms that have taken over government functions are earning as much as $8 million a year, according to a new report titled, “Exposed: America’s Highest Paid Government Workers.”

Monday, March 3

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Soaring Above Racism

Dr. Calvin J. Spann dared to live his dream

“Either we must attain freedom for the whole world or there will be no world left for any of us.” – Walter F. White, executive secretary of the NAACP

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Two Podners: Restaurant to retail

“Good service, good food and good people” is the motto of Two Podners Barbeque and Sea Food restaurants. The phrase is also intended to represent the elements that helped the restaurant grow from a single barbecue eatery into Two Podners Retail Eateries LLC, a down-home-dining empire.

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Monday Night Politics: Presiding over family law, issues

While early voting started on Feb. 17, Monday Night Politics – Meet the Candidates has continued to push to bring the community and the candidates together, in order to help each voter become as informed as possible at the polls. The Feb. 17 forum featured candidates from County Criminal Court 10, County Criminal Court 11, County Probate Court 2 and County Probate Court 3.

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Obama receives new agenda for jobs, freedom

A group of civil rights leaders met with President Obama and several members of his cabinet last week to discuss the 1963-2013: 21st Century Agenda for Jobs and Freedom, a formal document with more than 90 legislative policy and priority recommendations.

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Around the State

Dallas ISD will hold its fourth annual Dallas ISD Goes to College: E3 event for all middle and high school students and their parents on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Ellis Davis Field House at Jesse Owens Memorial Complex, 9191 S. Polk St. The college fair is free and provides many benefits to students and parents

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Lancaster students ride in style for special lunch celebration

Fourteen middle school students from Elsie Robertson Lancaster STEM Middle School were treated to a special lunch on Feb. 14 at Pappadeaux Seafood Kitchen.

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Black leaders in health, education honored for outstanding service

Two University of Texas at Arlington graduates will receive the Outstanding African American Alumni Award, the alumni chapter’s highest honor for an alumnae or alumnus, during the 24th Annual African American Alumni Chapter banquet on March 1 at the E.H. Hereford University Center on campus.

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Local museums team up to bring masterpieces onto Google Art Project

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art along with the Dallas Museum of Art and the Nasher Sculpture Center announced last week that they are adding a combined 1,700 high-resolution works of art to the Google Art Project. The project allows online visitors to explore the museums’ paintings, sculptures and other objects virtually.

Raising a village: Education beyond academics

On Saturday, St. Philip’s School and Community Center presented It’s a Wonderful Life at The Black Academy of Arts and Letters.

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What if Michael Dunn was Black?

By now, most people are familiar with who Michael Dunn is. If not, they have heard the name Jordan Davis

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NAACP spent lion’s share with non-Black media

The primary and most trustworthy source of news and information to Black Americans has been and continues to rest in the bosom of the Black Press.

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Blacks have more reasons to be fearful than Whites

In the years after enslavement, Southern Whites did all they could to return to a manner of slavery. No White “owned” a Black person, but many Whites behaved as if they did. Theoretically, Blacks were free to come and go as they pleased, but if they went to the wrong store, sat in the wrong part of the bus, or failed to yield narrow sidewalks to Whites, they could expect a physical confrontation.

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Fear factor: What the Dunn verdict says about us

“Jordan had no guns. He had no drugs. There was no alcohol. They were coming from the mall. They were being kids.” – Lucia McBath, mother of Jordan Davis

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Stand your what? American youth killed by adults with guns

The headlines in the case were sadly familiar. An angry adult armed with a gun used it to shoot and kill an unarmed Black teenager he thought seemed “bad.”

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Financial marketplace pressed to be more inclusive

After people of color were excluded last year from the two largest bond issuance deals in history – Verizon Communications, which sold $49 billion of debt, and Apple Inc., which sold $17 billion of debt – the Rainbow PUSH Wall Street Project is stepping up efforts to expand opportunity for African Americans, women and other disadvantaged groups.