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Are Black Students Worse?

Bias a factor in suspending Black students

Freddie Allen | 3/20/2014, 2:34 p.m.
A new collection of research shows that despite the myths surrounding Black student behavior, poverty and severity of the offense ...
Dallas ISD students file photos DISD and The Dallas Examiner

WASHINGTON (NNPA) – A new collection of research shows that despite the myths surrounding Black student behavior, poverty and severity of the offense have very little to do with the rate Black students are suspended from school.

Rather, the studies point a finger in another direction: the implicit bias perpetrated by school officials.

The Discipline Disparities Research-to-Practice Collaborative, a group of researchers, educators, advocates and policy analysts funded by the Atlantic Philanthropies and the Open Society Foundations, compiled the research on school discipline.

More than 3 million students from kindergarten to 12th grade were suspended during the 2009/2010 school year – twice the rate of suspensions since the 1970s, according to the Collaborative. Black students are nearly 3.5 times as likely to be suspended than their White peers.

In the briefing paper titled, Are Black Kids Worse? Myths and Facts about Racial Differences in Behavior, researchers from the Equity Project at Indiana University in Bloomington found that “there is simply no good evidence that racial differences in discipline are due to differences in rates or types of misbehavior by students of different races.”

Research also showed that despite popular myths, the relationship between poverty and disruptive school behavior has been overstated.

When researchers looked at middle school referrals, White students were more likely to get sent to office over “observable offenses” such as smoking and vandalism and Black students were disciplined more frequently for subjective reasons including disrespectful behavior, loud noise and defiance.

“In other words, regardless of a school’s official disciplinary policy, there are a variety of factors involved in determining a student’s punishment, not the least of which is the mood, ideology, philosophy, values, and biases of the adults making that decision,” stated the briefing paper on implicit bias. “The more subjective the category of offense – i.e., insubordination, disobedience, disruption, defiance – the greater the risk that bias [either explicit or unconscious] will seep into the process.”

Researchers often use the Implicit Association Test to measure implicit bias.

“Researchers have found that 80 percent of tested Whites and 40 percent of tested Blacks show a pro-White bias,” the briefing paper stated. “They consistently implicitly associate Blacks with negative attitudes such as bad and unpleasant, and with negative stereotypes such as aggressive and lazy.”

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin developed a “toolkit” of strategies to combat implicit bias including stereotype replacement, counter-stereotypic imagining that involves thinking about a famous or familiar person that debunks the stereotype, learning about a person’s background and developing an individualized response, tastes, hobbies and family, and perspective-taking.

“All children deserve access to a quality education, but too often, children of color are pushed out of the classroom – not because they’re behaving any worse than other students, but because of harsh and often discriminatory school disciplinary policies,” said Judith Browne Dianis, co-director of the Advancement Project and member of the research collaborative. “While the notion of a post-racial society is aspirational in theory, racial discrimination in school discipline is a major problem.”