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Conversation with JoAnne Bland

Special to The Dallas Examiner | 2/9/2015, 7:48 a.m.
JoAnne Bland has told her personal story at conferences and workshops across the country including the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, ...
The Dallas Examiner Logo Photo by Robyn H. Jimenez

Special to The Dallas Examiner

JoAnne Bland has told her personal story at conferences and workshops across the country including the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. On Sunday, at 3p.m. at Warren United Methodist Church, she will share her story with the Dallas community.

Bland has been actively involved in the Civil Rights Movement since 1961, when, as an 8-year-old child, she attended a voting rights meeting presided over by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. She joined other children and teenagers in the Civil Rights Movement as a member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. She was only 11 years old on March 7, 1965, when she was severely beaten and driven back across the Edmund Pettus Bridge by police determined to stop a group making a voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery.

Bland is co-founder and director of the National Voting Rights Museum and Institute in Selma, and is well known to civil rights pilgrims who meet with her as they travel across the South to learn about the tragedies and triumphs of the American Civil Rights Movement.