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A Place of Serenity in South Dallas

A new home for Dallas women in need

Chronic homelessness and poverty is an epidemic in many of our communities throughout South Dallas County. Last year, 3,314 individuals were reported as homeless or living in shelters, during a homeless count by Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance. Women and children are the most vulnerable group among that population.

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Service that made the difference

“Passion” and “compassion” were the words Gail Terrell employed when she described the positive characteristics she draws upon to serve the community in her position as a member of the Dallas Park and Recreation Board. Terrell, who is also the vice president of the board, said that the traits were instilled in her while growing up in Louisiana.

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The other victims of rape

The first time Tiffany Perry learned about her conception, she was too innocent to fully understand the gentle explanation her mother was offering, too young to process such a heavy and complicated behavior.

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Record-level of criminal exonerations

Black criminal defendants accounted for roughly 46 percent of the 125 known exonerations in 2014, the highest annual number of exonerations recorded since 1989, according to a national registry that tracks wrongful convictions.

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Hall of Fame honors achievements of legendary Black athletes

The enshrinement of the 2015 Class of Inductees of the Parrish Texas Black Sports Hall of Fame will “Celebrate Athletic Brilliance” during a luncheon on Saturday.

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Income inequality rises in all 50 states

Income inequality is rising and it affects workers in every state, according to a new report by the Economic Policy Institute. Researchers from EPI, a nonpartisan think tank focused on low- and middle-income workers, analyzed Internal Revenue Service data for all 50 states and found that not only was the income gap between the top 1 percent of earners and everyone else getting wider, but that the disparities were not just confined to financial centers in the east or technology centers on the west coast.

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The relevancy of Black history

Carter G. Woodson established Negro History Week, which began Feb. 12, 1926. He scheduled the week to match the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln.

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How Dick Gregory got a Hollywood star

Activist/SiriusXm satellite radio host Joe Madison was helping on a campaign to get the Four Tops a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame when he noticed another serious omission from the world-famous tribute to entertainers.

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Our history: Civic lessons, civil rights

Sam Cooke’s early 1960s pop tune, Don’t Know Much about History, was a big hit on the charts. Unfortunately, the gospel and soul star’s lyrics also expressed a reality that still haunts American society. Just Google the phrase “don’t know much about history,” and you’ll see the breadth of the evidence that Americans of all ages are, as a group, woefully ignorant about basic facts of America’s history and its governmental structure.

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We’ve had enough of poor leadership

How many times, especially during or just after a tragedy like the killing of Eric Garner, have you heard one of our “leaders” angrily say, “Enough is enough”? They say it as if their angry rhetoric will scare the perpetrators and make them stop mistreating us. More importantly, I believe, they use these words to stir up Black folks to the point of being willing to follow them and do whatever they tell us to do. To that I say, “Enough is enough!”

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Making no progress on race with ‘progressives’

like Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. Her progressive ideas are just what we need while Hilary Clinton is straddling the fence, and still cozying up with bankers. Warren says she isn’t running for president, but there are quite a few political action committees urging her to run.

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The legacy of Carter G. Woodson

The best way to celebrate Black History Month is to make more Black history. Black History Month is now celebrated around the world. We are grateful for the visionary leadership of noted historian and scholar Carter G. Woodson for being the founder of what was known as Negro History Week in 1926 that 44 years later evolved into Black History Month.

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Key substance protects against preterm birth

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified hyaluronon as a critical substance made by the body that protects against premature births caused by infection.

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Baby’s first cry: Critical moment in delivery room

“The first time I heard my baby cry, I think I cried as much as he did,” Rachel recalled. “It was like he was announcing that he was finally here and he’s healthy.” The sound of their newborn baby’s first cry is magical for parents. But it is also music to the ears of the medical professionals in the labor and delivery room. The medical providers involved eagerly await the baby’s first cry because it signals the newborn’s ability to breathe on its own.

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Give up gluten, not grains

Whether for medical reasons or by choice, consumer interest in gluten-free foods is on the rise. The U.S. market for gluten-free foods is expected to exceed $6.6 billion by 2017, signaling the practice of cutting consumption of wheat, barley and rye has gone mainstream.

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Give meals a nutrient boost

Feeding your family with nutrient dense foods can be as simple as making a few better-for-you choices. By definition, superfoods are calorie sparse and packed with beneficial nutrients that add health and flavor to meals. Because the human body cannot create these nourishing elements alone, the addition of these foods is essential for regular function and to defend against certain diseases and conditions. The next time you go shopping, stock up on some of these delicious foods.

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Madam Walker still inspiring Black community

In the early 1900s, Madam C.J. Walker turned her homemade recipes for hair and scalp care products into a business empire that made her the United States’ first self-made Black female millionaire.

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Toyota breaks ground in Plano

Last month, Toyota held a groundbreaking ceremony on the site of its future North America headquarters uniting branches from California, Kentucky and New York.

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Conversation with JoAnne Bland

JoAnne Bland has told her personal story at conferences and workshops across the country including the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. On Sunday, at 3p.m. at Warren United Methodist Church, she will share her story with the Dallas community.

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Delta Sigma Theta celebrates founders’ day

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. was founded by 22 African American collegiate women on the campus of Howard University on Jan. 13, 1913. Since then, the sorority has dedicated 102 years to service by creating programs to improve political, education, social and economic conditions.

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