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Dallas Selma march

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the historic Selma to Montgomery march, the founders of Faith Friday, Dr. Juanita Wallace and Akwete Tyehimba, will host “March for the Right to Vote.” Faith Friday is an organization dedicated to alleviating community issues. The march will take place on Friday from noon until 2 p.m. along the Continental Bridge.

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Black History and its relevancy: A Community Conversation

Many people today have a limited knowledge of Black history. There is limited information in public school textbooks about the struggles of African Americans, as well as our contributions to American history.

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We need a Shelby to D.C. march

After ceremonies wrap up Sunday in Alabama commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Selma-to-Montgomery March and the signing of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, a group of die-hard demonstrators will re-enact the full march.

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Smart economics: Black dollars matter!

The protest slogans addressing our latest struggle for justice and equity compel me to come up with a new phrase.

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The GOP’s acting-the-fool dynamic

Among the formal definitions for “acting the fool” are: One who is deficient in judgment, sense or understanding.

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Giuliani’s words do more than hurt – they divide

“A new expression has entered the Westminster lexicon: dog-whistle politics. It means putting out a message that, like a high-pitched dog-whistle, is only fully audible to those at whom it is directly aimed. The intention is to make potential supporters sit up and take notice while avoiding offending those to whom the message will not appeal.” – The Economist, March 2005

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As loan debts rise, foreclosures dip

A new economic analysis by the New York Federal Reserve Bank found fewer foreclosures, bankruptcies and credit card delinquencies. However the rates of delinquent auto and student loans are worse than before.

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CDC: Toddler food often has too much salt, sugar

Many packaged meals and snacks for toddlers contain worrisome amounts of salt and sugar, potentially creating an early taste for foods that may contribute to obesity and other health risks, according to a new government study.

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Blacks bear brunt of school suspensions

According to a report released last week, 3.5 million K-12 public school students were suspended in the 2011-2012 school year – enough to fill every stadium seat in Super Bowl 1 through Super Bowl 45.

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The loud silence of survivors

An online survey of sexual assault survivors conduced as part of this series vividly captures the fear and reluctance Black women rape survivors exhibit about sharing their ordeal with others:

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The finale: When the music lessons stop

The walls that were once covered with music notes and faces of composers were bare. Various trophies and accolades collected over the last four-and-a-half decades were boxed. The dry erase board is how students would learn the notes do, re and mi, but at the end of the day it was permanently erased.

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A celebration of a giant

Enveloped in a sea of red, the ballroom at the Hilton Hotel at Lincoln Center was filled with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority sisters, along with their family and friends, in celebration of the life and legacy of a local giant – Frederica Chase Dodd – during the annual Dallas Alumnae Chapter’s Founders’ Day luncheon on Feb. 7.

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Stagger Lee: An African American journey through the post-Reconstruction era

“This is all of our stories,” stated Will Power, the writer of the new musical Stagger Lee, as he addressed audience members during an after-show Stay Late program hosted by the Dallas Theater Center. “It’s a family story and it’s the communal story of all of our families and I just really appreciate the opportunity to be able to bring that forth.”

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Reflections: Life in a partially integrated society

I have heard the stories so many times. I feel I lived them – that I experienced them. The stories are real for me also – my husband’s experiences living in a partially integrated society – attending an integrated high school but not able to do so many things his White classmates could do: go to the movie theatre downtown, bowling ally, swimming pool and eat at restaurants, because he was a Negro. He was excluded from participating in many school activities with his classmates because of the color of his skin: i.e. school clubs, parties and study groups.

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DuBois, Trotter: My civil rights heroes

In the interest of full disclosure, I have been a W.E.B. DuBois fanatic since my teenage years in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. I have a healthy collection of books by and about DuBois, including David Levering Lewis’ two-volume biography of DuBois (W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century 1919-1963 and W. E. B. DuBois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919), each a winner of the Pulitzer Prize.

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Facing America’s lynching frenzy

We live in a era when humankind seems awash in war-driven atrocities. Men, and in some instances, boys – for this is, overwhelmingly, a matter of the sins of males – who once lived within the boundaries of decency have dedicated themselves to committing crimes of shocking depravity. Whether driven by tricked-up political ideologies, ethnic-group grievances or pseudo-religious mumbo-jumbo, many of these killers display a seemingly unfathomable desire to be inhuman, monstrous.

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Twin evils renewed: Terrorism and racism

There are two related violent phenomena that are now getting renewed public attention and research around the world, as well as considerable debate and denial. The twin evils are terrorism and racism.

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Selma marches on to let our voices soar above the mix

Selma. For those of a certain age, the word Selma is evocative of a time when people stood against insurmountable odds. It is an ever-lasting illustration of why the right to vote must never be taken for granted. People of all colors bled and died so that we might exercise that quintessential American right to choose our elected leaders. We must feed this spirit to a new generation so that they might experience the freedom that comes from knowing their history, so they are not doomed to repeat it.

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Fifty years of economic futility … Haven’t we had enough?

During the 50-year period from 1963 [“I have a dream!”] to 2013, Black people have been on a virtual economic treadmill. Our relative economic position has not changed; our unemployment rate has consistently been twice as high as the White unemployment rate, which was 5 percent for Whites and 10.9 percent for Blacks in 1963. Today, it’s 6.6 percent for Whites and 12.6 percent for Blacks.

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Gut Check: Can too much of a good thing be harmful?

Every year, more than 126,000 hospitalizations and 17,000 deaths in the U.S. are due to overdose or overuse of acetaminophens or NSAIDs, according to the American Gastroenterological Association. Consumer testing conducted by the AGA showed that people did not fully understand over-the-counter medications and the several health effects that can result from misuse.

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