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Mollie Finch Belt, publisher of The Dallas Examiner

Mollie Finch Belt, publisher of The Dallas Examiner

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One person can make a difference

Taylor Toynes, a first year teacher at W.W. Bushman Elementary School in Oak Cliff, was alarmed that his students did not have school supplies last year. They didn’t have backpacks or if they did they were torn and stunk.

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Joyce Ann Brown’s legacy

The news of Joyce Ann Brown’s death spread throughout Black Dallas last week. And while many may have been touched by the news of her passing, many more were touched by her life.

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Excellence in Journalism

The Press Club of Dallas awarded 13 Excellence in Journalism Awards on the night of May 21 at the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza in Downtown Dallas. The Press Club is committed to advocating and defending the free practice of non-partisan and unbiased journalism.

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The War on Poverty

When I graduated in May 1965 from The University of Denver with a B.A. degree, I wanted to find a job, not go to graduate school. Unfortunately, there were not many jobs available for recent college graduates with majors in sociology and psychology and no work experience. But I wanted to contribute to making our community better.

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Support goes both ways

Why should a candidate reach out to the African American community when voting records indicate that – out of over 40,000 eligible voters in each district – District 3 has 43,608, District 4 has 44,993, District 7 has 40,529 and District 8 has 40,925 – less than 3,000 residents voted in each of these Districts in the 2011 Dallas City Council election?

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Reflections: Life in a partially integrated society

I have heard the stories so many times. I feel I lived them – that I experienced them. The stories are real for me also – my husband’s experiences living in a partially integrated society – attending an integrated high school but not able to do so many things his White classmates could do: go to the movie theatre downtown, bowling ally, swimming pool and eat at restaurants, because he was a Negro. He was excluded from participating in many school activities with his classmates because of the color of his skin: i.e. school clubs, parties and study groups.

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Living in a segregated society – my reflections

This month I have spent more time than usual reflecting on my life in a segregated society. Seeing the movie Selma and events leading up to the march on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Alabama and looking at the movie Court Martial of Jackie Robinson made me remember my own experiences during segregation. On Aug. 7, 1943, I was born at Pinkston Clinic in North Dallas, a hospital that provided medical services to Negroes. Negro doctors were not allowed to practice at White hospitals in Dallas.

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An evening with Joanne Bland

Saturday I attended An Evening with Joanne Bland at The Black Academy of Arts and Letters.

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The relevancy of Black history

Carter G. Woodson established Negro History Week, which began Feb. 12, 1926. He scheduled the week to match the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln.

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‘Give Us the Ballot’

Martin Luther King Jr. said in his Give Us the Ballot address to the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom in Washington, D.C., on May 17, 1957: “Give us the ballot, and we will no longer have to worry the federal government about our basic rights.

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Continuing a legacy

Monday was the 29th year of the Elite News Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade and Festival in Dallas. It was the first year without Bill Blair, founder of the parade and publisher of the Elite News. Daryl Blair, his son and current publisher of the newspaper and chairman of the parade, chose me to be one of the grand marshals for the parade – and it was indeed an honor.

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Where do we go from here?

A couple of weeks ago the Dallas Branch of the NAACP sponsored their annual Freedom Fund event – which this year was “Pre Thanksgiving Luncheon: Expanding Civil Rights” held at Charlton Methodist Hospital.

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Affordable health care

Do you have health insurance? Prior to last year, many people did not have health care because they could not afford it.

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Black people are angry

There have been protests all over the United States from the West Coast to the East Coast

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Immigration reform is the right thing to do

President Barack Obama spoke to the American people last week explaining why he was going to take executive action to fix our broken immigration system

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One person can make a difference

This past week, I had the pleasure of talking with a young man who is a first-year teacher in the Dallas Independent School District. He teaches the fourth grade in a very low-income area of the city. The school doesn’t have a PTA and there is not a community liaison.

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Civil Rights Museum - A must experience

The new Center for Civil and Human Rights Museum – referred to as the Civil Rights Museum by the community – that opened in Atlanta, Georgia, July 1 is a must to experience.

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Getting out the Black vote

Monday night at the African American Museum, Community Conversation presented by The Dallas Examiner, took the format of a workshop on “How To Get the Black Vote Out.”

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Did you vote this time?

Only 2.01 percent of eligible voters in Dallas County voted in the May 27 primary runoff election.

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Can morality be legislated?

I left Dallas in 1961 after graduating from Lincoln High School, one of three segregated high schools in the city.

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Never ever give up!

In November, my husband and I attended The Rivers, Toney and Watson Annual Awards Ceremony established in 1981and named in honor of the first three African American judges elected to office in New York state.

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The value of good teachers

Teaching is probably one of the most important professions because it directly contributes to an educated society. For generations, it has been the cornerstone in forming the minds of our youth into the next generation of leaders. Unfortunately, teaching is not a career young people say they want to pursue today because of the low pay and status of teachers in our society.

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Investigating the segregated South

We have all read about the many murders of civil rights workers in the 60s in Mississippi and Alabama – people working for Blacks to have the right to vote. These people sacrificed their lives so that Blacks could vote.

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Prevention is the key to a healthy community

Sixty-nine years ago my grandmother died of breast cancer. She may have lived if she had access to medical care. She lived in Dallas in 1944. Dallas was a segregated city at that time. Access to medical care was far from equal even though we had Black physicians.