Quantcast
1:13 a.m., 7/28/2014 |  Sign in
82°

Danielle Belton

Blogger

Belton is best known as the editor/writer of the pop culture-meets-politics blog The Black Snob. Blacksnob.com has a readership spanning political junkies, journalists, fellow bloggers, political pundits, authors, academics, legislators and political strategists. The Black Snob has earned both critical acclaim, appearing in Time Magazine, The New York Times, The Observer (UK), The Daily Beast, Essence Magazine, The Associated Press, The American Prospect, as well as appearing on CNN, MSNBC, NPR, PBS, Good Morning America, HLN, ABC’s Nightline, Al Jazeera English and Russia Today. As a commentator, Belton is currently a regular contributor to NPR's Tell Me More with Michel Martin. She formerly contributed to PBS' To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe and CNN Sundays, as well as NPR’s News and Notes with Farai Chideya.

Belton is currently Editor-At-Large for Clutch Magazine Online, and is the former head writer for BET Networks’ late night news program Don’t Sleep, with former CNN news anchor T.J. Holmes.



Recent Stories

Tease photo

She's An Icon: Top 10 Black Women Who Are Making Black History Today

We all (hopefully) know the stellar history of our fore-mothers like Sojourner Truth, Phyllis Wheatley, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells, Fannie Lou Hammer, Dorothy Height and Lena Horne. But there are black women making moves today who are likely to join those names in our history books and become legends in their own right.

Tease photo

Post-Obama: The Future of the Black Body Politic After the Age of Obama

When then Senator Barack Obama turned into President Barack Obama after his historic 2008 election it had all the pageantry, zeal and aura of a religious revelation for many. It was something a long time coming -- a win after a war that has been on-going for decades, centuries. But for all the pomp and excitement, it was short-lived. Once the party was over, on came the political hangover.

Tease photo

To Assimilate or Infiltrate: The War for (and Against) Being Undeniably Black

When I was in the 9th grade I wrote a cartoon strip where the heroine’s name was Daphne. A white male classmate of mine who enjoyed reading my stories immediately complained that I’d give the girl a weird “black” name. I, politely, explained to him that the name was pronounced “Daff-nee” and that Daphne was a name from Greek mythology. Or, if that was too deep for him, a white female character from the cartoon “Scooby Doo.” No matter, to my “it’s all black names” to me friend. It was a weird name with a weird spelling, so it was a weird “black name.”

Tease photo

Voting Rights: Under Threat Then, Still Under Threat Now

Georgia resident Dorothy Cooper had been voting for more than 50 years with no problem, but in 2012 she almost couldn’t. It was all due to the new voter ID law Georgia had passed under the guise of fighting voter fraud, but critics of the law said its real purpose was to make it harder for individuals like Cooper – the black, the poor and the elderly – to vote.



More stories