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Freddie Allen

Stories by Freddie

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DOJ urged to stay focused on police killings

Officials from the National Action Network, the National Urban League, the National Bar Association, the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, the NAACP, the American Civil Liberties Union and other civil rights groups have urged the Department of Justice to remain focused on the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner cases and to make sure that the police officers involved are held responsible for their deaths.

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CBC joins Black churches for ‘Freedom Sunday’

If the Democrats lose the United States Senate and more seats in the House of Representatives in the upcoming midterm elections, Marcia Fudge, chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, said that the Republicans would impeach President Barack Obama.

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National campaign to fight police brutality

In an effort to combat police brutality in the Black community, the National Bar Association recently announced plans to file open records requests in 25 cities to study allegations of police misconduct.

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Falling further behind on race relations

Twenty years after signing the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, the United States continues to struggle with racial disparities in every major sector of American society.

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Upcoming changes to PLUS loans may help Blacks

This fall, the Department of Education plans to announce changes to PLUS loans that officials say will make it easier for parents to qualify for the financial aid program that thousands of Black college students rely on every semester.

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Black men show little signs of progress in 40 years

Black men are no better off than they were more than 40 years ago, due to mass incarceration and job losses suffered during the Great Recession, according to a new report by researchers at the University of Chicago.

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Marches, protests predate 1964 March on Washington

Although many are nostalgically reflecting on 50 years ago when the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was signed into law, there was no universal agreement on what tactics to deploy in the fight for equality, according to a report on the movement by the Economic Policy Institute.

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All students benefit from minority teachers

Despite the cry from people of color for more teachers who look like them, both Whites and Blacks benefit from a more diverse teaching force, according to a study by Center of American Progress.

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Obama acts to ease student loan debt

From 2003 to 2014, student debt in America skyrocketed from $250 million to $1.2 trillion, surpassing credit card debt. As more students, especially Black students, rely on grants and loans to get through college, President Barack Obama has stepped up with a series of executive orders to ease the pain of borrowers in college and after they graduate.

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Mobilizing key groups can change politics of the Deep South

As voters’ rights advocates and civil rights leaders commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1964 “Freedom Summer” in Mississippi, a new study by the Center for American Progress finds that shifting demographics in the South can help to accelerate meaningful social and political change.

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New report: Blacks are ‘beyond broke’

The growing racial wealth gap – $200 in median wealth for Blacks in 2011 and $23,000 for Whites – threatens national economic security in the United States, according to a recent report by the Center for Global Policy Solutions.

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Obama’s Promise Zones: Only one is majority-Black

Despite the disproportionate impact of poverty found in African American communities, only one of President Barack Obama’s “Promise Zones,” is majority-Black, according to a new report.

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Generic drug labeling changes cause concern

A proposed rule change for generic drug labels, crafted by the Food and Drug Administration, could cost patients, health care providers and drug manufacturers billions of dollars and limit access to affordable prescription drugs for minorities and the poor, according to more than a dozen organizations that serve people of color.

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Full-time employment hurts Black students’ full-time enrollment

More than 60 percent of Black students could receive greater financial aid for college through the Pell Grant program, if they were enrolled full-time, according to a new report by the National Urban League.

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Controversy surrounds ‘My Brother’s Keeper’

A controversy last week over potential funding linked to President Barack Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative underscored concerns that groups led by people of color have expressed over access to public and private sector resources.

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Sentenced to die: Too many innocent Blacks executed

Since 1973, more than 300 innocent defendants have been sentenced to death, largely because Blacks are overrepresented among murder convictions and among those who are wrongfully condemned to die, according to a recent report.

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Megacommunities bridge STEM gap

In an effort to address persistent racial disparities in science and engineering careers, educators and community stakeholders have embraced the “megacommunity” model of cooperation.

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Race for Results shows Black children rank last on milestone index

Despite great progress that grew out of the Civil Rights Movement, “a web of stubborn obstacles remains” that prevents children of color, especially Black children, from reaching their full potential, according to a recent report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

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Suspended from Preschool?

Black student discipline triple that of Whites

Even before they typically learn to read, African American children – some as young as 4 years old – are taught a disgusting lesson: discrimination.

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Task force to revitalize the Black community

Rev. R.B. Holmes, a civil rights leader and pastor of the Bethel Missionary Baptist Church in Tallahassee, Fla., is heading up a task force of 40 ministers to undertake a 12-point action plan to revitalize the Black community, taking on issues ranging from the repeal of controversial “stand your ground” laws to supporting Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

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Final push to get Blacks signed up for ACA

With less than two weeks left to sign up for insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, grassroots supporters of the mandatory law and federal health officials are rushing to enroll Blacks, other people of color and young people in order to meet the Obama administration’s goal of reaching 7 million people by the end of this month.

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Are Black Students Worse?

Bias a factor in suspending Black students

A new collection of research shows that despite the myths surrounding Black student behavior, poverty and severity of the offense have very little to do with the rate Black students are suspended from school.

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Obama signs ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ initiative

No one had seen President Barack Obama more emotional than last week when he announced “My Brother’s Keeper,” a new initiative aimed at helping young Black men.

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Obama receives new agenda for jobs, freedom

A group of civil rights leaders met with President Obama and several members of his cabinet last week to discuss the 1963-2013: 21st Century Agenda for Jobs and Freedom, a formal document with more than 90 legislative policy and priority recommendations.

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Blacks still victimized by ‘stand your ground’

Two years ago, 14-year-old Trayvon Martin was returning from a trip from a nearby 7-Eleven store in Sanford, Fla., to purchase a bag of Skittles and a can of Arizona tea when he was confronted by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watchman.

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Not enough Blacks receiving HIV treatment

Even though Blacks get tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, more than other groups, health care providers continue to struggle to get Blacks into treatment and keep them there, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Unemployment rate falls to 11.9 percent for Blacks

The unemployment rate for Blacks dipped to 11.9 percent in December, according to the Labor Department, largely because likely workers, discouraged after months of searching for jobs with little prospects, have simply stopped looking.

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Millions of Blacks still not covered

As the Obama administration makes strides to improve the functionality of HealthCare.gov, the flagship website for the Affordable Care Act, Republican lawmakers continue to block federal funds that would help millions of poor Blacks get health insurance coverage.

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Many in-home workers live in poverty

In-home workers, 90 percent of them women, often live in poverty, earn low wages and work grueling hours without many of the protections enjoyed by most workers, according to a recent study by the Economic Policy Institute, a non-profit think tank focused on public policy that affects low- and middle-income families.

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New report calls for full employment

Fifty years ago, civil rights leaders dove headfirst into the on-going debate over American economic policy by placing the fight for equal employment opportunities at the forefront of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

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Having access to excellent teachers is civil right

A new study suggests that access to “excellent teachers” should be a civil right and that students should be able to “take legal action” to get better results.

Young Black voters pay higher ‘time tax’ at the polls

As the American electorate becomes more diverse, new voting laws threaten to disenfranchise young Black and Latino voters in what a new report called “the largest wave of voter suppression since the enactment of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.”

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Blacks continue fight to secure voting rights

When lawmakers ratified the 15th Amendment in 1870, protecting voting rights for Blacks, opponents of the law lashed out, violently at times,

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Racism costs U.S. billions annually

Closing the income gap between Whites and minorities would boost earnings by 12 percent, an economic windfall of $1 trillion, for a nation burdened by debt and an anemic job market, according to a recent study by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Altarum Institute.

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Unemployment for Black women at 4-year low

As job prospects for Whites and Black men have slowed or stalled completely, Black women continue to gain ground in a weak labor market, according to the latest jobs report.

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Many poor Blacks in the South will remain uninsured

Even if healthcare.gov, the web portal for the federal health insurance exchange, worked perfectly, more than 5 million poor, uninsured adults, many of them Black, will continue to go without coverage, because they live in states that didn’t expand Medicaid, according to a recent brief by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Website stumbles on launch

Last week, President Barack Obama said what many people who visited healthcare.gov to browse and buy affordable health insurance already knew: The website, tied so heavily to the success of the Affordable Care Act, wasn’t working properly.

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Black farmers collect $1.2 billion

For decades, Black farmers fought the United States Department of Agriculture over racial discrimination. The farmers, mostly in the South, lost crops, their farms and their homes. Some farmers grew old and died waiting for the slow hand of justice to turn in their favor, but those that still toil in the fields can proclaim victory, the government has finally started cutting checks in the $1.2 billion settlement case known as “Pigford II.”

Bank to pay minority borrowers $2.85 million

Chevy Chase Bank agreed to pay $2.85 million to Black and Latino borrowers, following allegations of discriminatory home lending practices. The Maryland-based bank joins Wells Fargo and Bank of America as banking institutions that paid out million dollar settlements in class action lawsuits following the housing crisis.

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HBCUs must adapt to teach 21st century students

As Historically Black Colleges and Universities adapt to the rapidly changing educational landscape, advocates say that collaborative partnerships in business, in the community, and on campus will be needed to ensure that HBCUs survive and thrive in the 21st century.

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Black farmers collect $1.2 billion

For decades, Black farmers fought the United States Department of Agriculture over racial discrimination. The farmers, mostly in the South, lost crops, their farms and their homes. Some farmers grew old and died waiting for the slow hand of justice to turn in their favor, but those that still toil in the fields can proclaim victory, the government has finally started cutting checks in the $1.2 billion settlement case known as “Pigford II.”

Justice Department will sue N.C. over new voting laws

Stepping up efforts to combat voting laws that discriminate against Blacks, Attorney General Eric Holder announced plans to sue North Carolina over restrictive, new voting laws that critics say will suppress the minority vote.

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Black children among the nation’s poorest

As the American economy stumbles through an uneven economic recovery, Black children continue to suffer record levels of poverty, including 1 in 4 Black children under 5 years of age that live in extreme poverty, according to the Census Bureau.

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Insurance exchanges will extend coverage to millions

In less than a week, health insurance market exchanges will open across the nation and more than 40 million Americans, including 7 million uninsured Blacks, who were previously shut out of the health care system, will finally get access to neeeded care.

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Yes, the rich are getting richer

A new report confirms the old saw: The rich are getting richer. According to a report titled, Striking it Richer: The Evolution of Top Incomes in the United States by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, “From 2009 to 2012, average real income per family grew modestly by 6.0 percent but the gains were very uneven. Top 1 percent incomes grew by 31.4 percent while bottom 99 percent incomes grew only by 0.4 percent. “Hence, the top 1 percent captured 95 percent of the income gains in the first two years of the recovery.”

Obama’s reform plan ‘misplaced’ for HBCUs

President Barack Obama’s proposal to make colleges more affordable has some good points, but could disproportionately harm Historically Black Colleges and Universities, many of whom are already reeling from changes in the college student loan program that is causing fewer students to remain enrolled in Black colleges, according to education experts.

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Ben Jealous resigns as NAACP president

Five years ago, Benjamin Jealous, president and CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, made two promises. The first was to the NAACP to help the organization get to the next level, revitalizing the mission and the relevancy of the storied civil rights group for the 21st century and old and new battles ahead.

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New Black Paper seeks to call activists to action

“There is a ‘state of emergency’ without urgency in Black America,”

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Fiftieth Anniversary of March on Washington more diverse

The 50th Anniversary for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom celebrated a more diverse coalition and needs, but the central themes resonated around voting rights, jobs, gun violence and equality in minority communities.

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‘Stop-and-frisk’ policy declared unconstitutional

The stop-and-frisk policy practiced by the New York City police department was little more than “indirect racial profiling,” according to a federal judge who ruled that police routinely violated the Fourth and 14th Amendment rights of Blacks and Latinos.

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