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George Curry

Stories by George

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Democrats’ smart butt White boys syndrome

In 1984, former UN Ambassador Andrew Young described the inner circle of Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale as “smart a– White boys” who thought they knew everything.

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China dominated US-Africa summit

Although the continent of Africa has 54 countries, the nation that received the most attention at last week’s US-Africa Summit in Washington, D.C., was China. That’s because the U.S. is trying to catch up with and surpass the Asian superpower. Africa has six of the top 10 fastest-growing economies: Angola, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Chad, Mozambique and Rwanda. From 2011-2015, Africa is expected to hold seven of the top 10 spots: Ethiopia, Mozambique, Tanzania, Congo, Ghana, Zambia and Nigeria.

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Obama seeks ‘long term’ partnership with Africa

President Barack Obama announced Tuesday that the federal government and private U.S. companies are investing $33 billion in Africa – $12 billion in new commitments

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The politics of federal judges

The two conflicting appeals court rulings last week on the legality of a key provision of the Affordable Care Act – one supporting it and the other rejecting the health law – underscore the nexus between politics and the judiciary. All of the judges voting to uphold the ACA were appointed by Democrats. All of the judges voting to strike down the law were appointed by Republicans.

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A victory for affirmative action

Almost lost among the news last week about the war in the Middle East and a war of another kind in Washington between Republicans and President Obama was a bit of good news:

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Republicans’ selective memory on executive orders

To paraphrase Ronald Reagan, arguably the most overrated U.S. president in history, there they go again.

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GM’s Eric Peterson loves dealing in diversity

After working 37 years for General Motors, it is not unusual for Eric Peterson, vice president of Diversity Dealer Relations, to walk into a Black dealership and be introduced to one of the owner’s children.

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Them Democrats ‘ain’t loyal’

Rev. Jamal Bryant of Baltimore was widely criticized recently for quoting a line from a popular Chris Brown song: “Hoes ain’t loyal.” Bryant could have avoided controversy – and been on point – if he had instead said, “Democrats ain’t loyal.” They ain’t, to borrow the vernacular.

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Right-wing gets it wrong on Mississippi

If you ever doubted that conservatives were sore losers, the recent Senate election in Mississippi should remove all doubt.

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‘You still can’t download freedom’

Rapidly expanding technology, social media and new smart phone apps are no substitute for the hard work needed to fight persistent racism in the United States, said Thomas N. Todd, a longtime Chicago activist and civil rights lawyer.

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Freedom Summer – 50 years Later

The 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer is being commemorated this week in Mississippi and it provides the perfect backdrop to reflect on the transformation of not only Mississippi, then the deadliest state in the nation, but the entire region.

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Hollywood gets a low diversity rating

The first detailed study of the relationship between diversity and the bottom line in the Hollywood entertainment industry has found that although diversity pays – literally – people of color and women are still woefully underrepresented throughout film and television.

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U.S. has always ‘negotiated’ with terrorists

– I disagree with President Obama’s decision to trade five Taliban leaders being held at Guantanamo Bay for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, an apparent deserter who is believed to have been the only U.S. solider being held as a prisoner of war in Afghanistan.

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African American men want ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ expanded to include Black females

More than 200 African American men, ranging from a taxi driver to university professors, sent a letter to President Obama on Tuesday urging him to expand his Black male initiative to include Black girls and women, saying they were “surprised and disappointed” that the president had sought to include only half of the race to tackle community-wide issues.

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New NAACP president says protest in his DNA

When Rev. Frederick D. Haynes III of Dallas, Texas, learned that the NAACP Board of Directors had chosen Cornell William Brooks over him, Attorney Barbara R. Arnwine and several other better known candidates to succeed outgoing president Benjamin Todd Jealous, his response was “Who?”

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Right-wing media: racism doesn’t exist

A new posting by MediaMatters.org, the media watchdog group, sums up the conservative strategy under the headline, “Don’t Litigate It, Don’t Ever Talk about It: Right-Wing Media’s Solution to Racial Discrimination.”

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Republicans are veteran hypocrites

If you let the Republicans tell it, President Obama is directly responsible for the fiasco at the Veterans Administration.

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The browning of public schools after Brown

This is the 60th anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision outlawing “separate but equal” schools. And like most major anniversaries, incorrect information surfaces as purported fact, doing a disservice to the accomplishment being celebrated as well as truth itself.

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NAACP Presidential Selection Process Again Mired in Controversy

Five years ago, Dr. Frederick D. Haynes III, senior pastor of Friendship-West Baptist Church, was named as the top candidate five years ago to become president and CEO of the NAACP by a search firm hired by the NAACP.

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Compensation for college athletes

Athletes at Northwestern University shocked the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the governing body of college sports, by taking steps to unionize student/athletes

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The question no one is asking Sterling

Why would a White racist have sex with a person of color?

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Racist NBA owner has fouled out

New NBA Commissioner Adam Silver wants to spend several days “investigating” the clearly racist remarks of L.A. Clippers owner Donald Sterling.

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Clippers owner banned from NBA and fined $2.5 million

After Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling was sternly denounced for racist comments by a spectrum of individuals, ranging from President Barack Obama to NBA superstar LeBron James, NBA Commissioner Alan Silver fined Sterling $2.5 million and banned him from the NBA for life.

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Tobacco ‘apology’ ads still excludes most Black media

A revised plan for major tobacco companies to purchase court-ordered ads to admit that they deliberately misled the public about the dangers of smoking would add nine White-owned newspapers to the list of publications carrying tobacco “apology” ads but shut out more than 90 percent of Black newspapers and all Black-owned radio and television stations, according to documents filed in federal court.

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Schools more segregated now than three decades ago

As we approach May 17, the 60th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education landmark decision outlawing “separate but equal” schools, several studies show that our schools are more segregated now than they were three decades ago.

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Memories of LBJ, Carter and Clinton

Covering the three-day celebration of the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act at the University of Texas last week brought back a string of memories – some fond, some bitter.

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Obama: Civil Rights Movement opened door for me

With civil rights legends Andrew Young, John Lewis, Julian Bond and Jesse Jackson looking on, President Barack Obama on Thursday credited the Civil Rights Movement and landmark legislation signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson in the 1960s for paving the way for his becoming the nation’s first Black president.

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Bill Clinton says voter ID laws undermine civil rights progress

Former President Bill Clinton praised President Lyndon B. Johnson for signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act into law, but said the progress that stemmed from those landmark measures are being undermined by Republican-led efforts to suppress the vote.

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Jimmy Carter: My life was shaped by ‘Black culture’

AUSTIN – Although he grew up in a rural farming community in Georgia during an era of rigid racial segregation in the 1920s and 1930s, former President Jimmy Carter said his life was shaped at an early age by “Black culture.”

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Bush says education achievement gap is ‘scandalous’

AUSTIN, Texas – Former President George W. Bush said the education achievement gap – up to four years at some grade-levels – is a “nation scandal” that deserves immediate action.

NUL State of Black America: Growing income inequality

The wealth gap between African Americans and Whites has expanded in recent years and is not likely to narrow without significant reductions in Black unemployment and changes in a system that favors the wealthy over poor and middle class Americans, according the National Urban League’s 38th annual State of Black America report titled, “One Nation Underemployed: Jobs Rebuild America.”

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Acceptance by Ivies doesn’t remove stigma

You would think that news of a high school student from a family of African immigrants getting accepted into all eight Ivy League universities would be met with universal celebration. If you thought that, think again.

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Black Press: Howard professor needs ‘reality check’

Howard University Journalism Professor Clint C. Wilson II’s broad criticism of the Black Press proves that he needs a “reality check,” said Ben Chavis, leader of a group of 1970s activists known as the Wilmington 10.

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Buy Black: Economic empowerment

Margarita “Maggie” Anderson wants to transform “Buy Black” from a leftover 1960s slogan to a modern economic empowerment strategy. And because she has lived it, there is no person better qualified to lead the charge.

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Obama worse than Bush on SBA loans

When I interviewed Marie Johns, then the outgoing deputy secretary of the Small Business Administration, a year ago, she said the SBA does not separate figures by race, though it hopes to do so at some point.

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President Obama’s surprising jobs record

Although unemployment rates are unacceptably high, especially for African Americans, President Obama has done a better job improving the jobless rate than most critics are willing to concede.

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‘Dead end’ Republican politics exposed

When Darrell Issa, R-Calif., the chairman of the House Oversight Committee, shares more information with conservative Fox News than with Elijah Cummings, D-Md., the ranking Democrat on the committee, that’s enough to make Cummings go ballistic.

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My sister’s keeper for Black girls

In all the hoopla surrounding President Barack Obama’s “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative, overlooked is the fact that our young girls also need to be targeted for special attention.

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Financial marketplace pressed to be more inclusive

After people of color were excluded last year from the two largest bond issuance deals in history – Verizon Communications, which sold $49 billion of debt, and Apple Inc., which sold $17 billion of debt – the Rainbow PUSH Wall Street Project is stepping up efforts to expand opportunity for African Americans, women and other disadvantaged groups.

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Another Florida man gets away with murder

As we approach the second anniversary of Trayvon Martin’s murder in Sanford, Fla., justice again has been shortchanged in the Sunshine State.

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King must be ‘turning in his grave’ over family greed

The children of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. sue each other – as well as loyal family friends – so often that you need a program to keep up with the court action. Bernice and Martin Luther King III sued Dexter because he failed to open the books of their father’s estate.

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Judge to decide in Black Press vs. tobacco case

A “concerned” U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler is expected to rule next week on whether advertising she ordered major tobacco companies to purchase in order to correct their past false statements about the danger of smoking should be expanded to include Black media.

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Seattle ‘misfits’ fit enough to win

Prior to Sunday’s Super Bowl, I told anyone who would listen that I like both the Denver Broncos and the Seattle Seahawks, so I wouldn’t be terribly disappointed regardless of who won the game. But … I was hoping Seattle would emerge the victor and I will tell you why.

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Obama seeks to do something with a do-nothing Congress

President Obama’s State of the Union speech Tuesday night, parts of which were shared over the weekend, was designed to be upbeat and to again sketch his vision for an economically “United” States of America. But this year’s speech, like the one a year ago and like his second inaugural address, was a gallant effort to remain relevant during an era of a do-nothing Congress that will do even less in 2014.

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‘If I dated Black girls …’

“I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.” – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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African Americans snubbed in youth smoke out

The U.S. Justice Department and the Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund have reached an agreement with the four major tobacco companies that requires them to spend more than $30 million advertising with the three major television networks and run full-page ads in 35 White and Hispanic newspapers as well as purchasing space on their respective websites but not make a single purchase from a Black print or broadcast media company.

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The War on Poverty – and MLK

We are celebrating the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty at roughly the same time we’re observing the 85th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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Senators exert ‘silent veto’ over potential judges

President Obama’s recent nominations of federal judges in Georgia – including one who supported regressive voter ID laws and another who favored retaining the confederate emblem as part of the state flag – highlights a failed system that effectively allows home-state U.S. senators to veto presidential judicial selections.

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Walking in Mandela’s footsteps

PRETORIA, South Africa – It’s not easy walking in the footsteps of Nelson Mandela, the nation’s first democratically elected president. No one knows that better than the two men who succeeded him as president of South Africa.

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Africa completes 10 days of mourning for Nelson Mandela

QUNU, South Africa (NNPA) – With a rich mixture of ceremonial military pomp and ancient tribal customs, Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s first democratically elected president, was buried here Sunday in the village of his youth, culminating 10 days of national mourning.

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