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JAZELLE HUNT

Stories by JAZELLE

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Concussions worse for Black youth

Despite the flurry of news about NFL lawsuits over concussions, the problem affects far more athletes at the high school and junior high school level, according to the federal government statistics.

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U.S. political views not rigidly defined

Politically, the nation is less a sharply divided collection of red and blue states, and more a rainbow patchwork of political ideologies, according to the Pew Center.

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‘Promising’ cancer treatments on the horizon

Cancer is the nation’s second-leading cause of death for both Blacks and Whites. While there is no known cure for cancer, a flurry of FDA approval requests to treat the most threatening cancer cases has researchers optimistic that progress is being made toward an eventual cure.

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Reparations for North Carolina sterilization victims

Victims who were sterilized in North Carolina between 1929 and 1974 – approximately 7,600 people – have until the end of June to file a claim with the state, according to government officials.

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‘I’m still standing’: Rachel Jeantel, a year after Trayvon Martin trial

As Rachel Jeantel inched toward a high school diploma, she tried to keep in mind that she had a promise to keep. Her slain friend, Trayvon Martin, would have wanted her to finish school, and she had promised his parents and other supporters that she would.

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Remembering Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou opened her life to open our eyes

The day before she died, Maya Angelou telephoned Ebony magazine headquarters in Chicago to tell new Editor-in-Chief Mitzi Miller that she was proud of her.

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Students, educators present post-Brown Challenge

In 1954, Lucinda Todd was one of 13 plaintiffs in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case that declared “separate but equal” unconstitutional. Last week, her granddaughter Lucinda Noches Talbert stood on the steps of the Supreme Court and continued making the argument for equal public education under the law.

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Obama administration to grade teacher training

Teachers have always graded students. The Obama administration feels the time has come for someone to grade teachers.

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Med students don’t wait to give back

According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, there are only 2.3 physicians for every 1,000 people in the United States.

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Millennials are more diverse – in many ways

Millennials are easy to spot

If passed, the ABLE Act could help disabled to save

As of 2006, more than 2.4 million African Americans receiving Social Security benefits are disabled, or are the spouses or children of disabled, retired or deceased workers.

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Black families becoming more aware of autism

As Camille Proctor watched her 1-year-old son, she knew something wasn’t right

Black women still penalized for race and gender

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed race- and gender-based discrimination. Now, 50 years later, Black women still suffer under the double-whammy of race and gender.

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Minorities herded into private prisons

Although private schools are often lauded for providing a better education to students, the same can’t be said of private prisons, which house a disproportionate number of people of color, according to a report published in the latest issue of Radical Criminology, an online scholarly journal.

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Some ‘government workers’ earning CEO wages

The CEOs of some private firms that have taken over government functions are earning as much as $8 million a year, according to a new report titled, “Exposed: America’s Highest Paid Government Workers.”

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Expanding Educational Opportunity summit

Thirty years ago, one year of tuition, room and board at a nation’s four-year, degree-granting institution cost $8,756 on average (or $3,499, when adjusted for inflation).

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Moving the race dialogue forward

George Zimmerman. Paula Deen. And, more recently, Seattle Seahawks star defensive cornerback Richard Sherman. Just the mention of their name ignites a passionate discussion on race.

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U.S. retirement crisis has ‘racial component’

More than three-fifths of Black working-age households – 62 percent – have no assets in a retirement account, according to a new study by the National Institute of Retirement Security.

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Parental involvement at D.C. school in a class by itself

Stepping into the cozy Parent Center at Orr Elementary School in Southeast Washington, D.C., is like grabbing a cup of coffee with an old friend.

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Uninsured Blacks eligible for more aid

As President Obama continues a revised campaign to shore up American confidence in the Affordable Care Act, a new report released today points out that 6 out of 10 uninsured African Americans who are eligible for insurance through the Affordable Care Act’s marketplaces – 4.2 million people – may also be eligible for federal options and/or financial assistance with health care costs.

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Hopeful signs in the HIV/AIDS war

Rae Lewis Thornton likes to sneak in a tranquil tea time between expanding her brand and the 16 pills she has to take each day. But that’s nothing compared to the 21 pills she was taking in her darkest days of battling full-blown AIDS.

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The U.S. revolution that supported Mandela

Nearly three decades ago, a handful of prominent Black activists began organizing a movement that would eventually help break the back of apartheid in South Africa and force the U.S. government and American companies to end their support of White minority rule on the continent.

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Dumping ‘at risk’ and other negative labels

Although most of today’s headlines focus on Black educational failures, there are many positive achievements by Black students that often go overlooked, according to a new study.

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Warning: Subtle racism damages health

“My office says my name, Rachel, on the door. I am the only one who sits in it. People constantly walk in, see me, and say, ‘Oh, I’m sorry … I’m looking for Rachel.’ I’m half Black.”

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Millions fall into health care coverage gap

Every day Richard Green, 67, wakes up in pain. He creeps over to the edge of the bed and sets his feet down, bracing himself for the day ahead. First are the pangs of putting each leg into his slacks. Then, he undergoes the torment of sliding each arm into his shirt.

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Back on the job, federal workers worry about another shutdown

After a little more than two weeks, things have finally gotten back to normal in the nation’s capital. At least, normal by Washington standards.