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Julianne Malveaux

Stories by Julianne

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Stimulating students during summer

It’s mid-July. Do you know if your children are learning? Just a month ago they were eager to leave the regimentation of the daily classroom to “enjoy the summer.”

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They get it: Ikea and the Gap fill the wage gap

President Obama would like the national minimum wage to rise to $10.10 an hour. By executive order, he has already raised the minimum wage for federal contractors. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, has threatened to sue Obama for his use of executive order, which he says circumvents Congressional authority.

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Blacks have not recovered from the recovery

Judging from its June 18-19 meeting, the Federal Reserve is hedging its bets. It says the U.S. economy is on the mend, but more slowly than expected. They’ve reduced their estimate for economic growth and say that it will take a year or more to get to where we were six years ago.

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Did the UNCF make a deal with the devil?

When the Koch Foundation gave the United Negro College Fund $25 million, it set off a maelstrom of comments in cyberspace and real time

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A pledge to keep to our youth of the other 99 percent

As young people graduate from high school, or finish the school year as sophomores and juniors, they begin to search for summer jobs. For the past several summers, the jobs have not been there, and this summer will be no different. It is true that economists are projecting a better employment situation for the college graduates who are entering the labor market now. At the same time, those high school graduates who must save money for college incidentals or for other needs will have a hard time finding work.

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Maya Angelou: Generous heart, formidable strength

Many people will remember Maya Angelou for her phenomenal career. She was a true Renaissance woman – an author, teacher, dancer, performer, radio personality and a producer.

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Inadequate care, housing dishonors our veterans

The last Monday in May, Memorial Day, was designed to honor those who died in service to our country. It is tragically ironic that around the same time we are honoring and remembering the dead, we are learning about deficiencies in the Department of Veterans Affairs that negatively affects the quality of life for those who were injured during their term of service.

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Response to Nigerian atrocities too slow

Long after completing his eight-year presidency, William Jefferson Clinton acknowledged that he should have intervened in the conflict in Rwanda

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Economy is still recovering, though recovery slow for some

During 2013, the U.S. economy experienced a reasonable level of growth. The 3.4 percent growth rate in the second half of 2013 represented a solid growth rate, but not enough to trickle down to those who live at the periphery of the economy.

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Supreme Court continues to limit affirmative action

The Roberts Supreme Court decided last week that voters in the state of Michigan had the right to ban affirmative action policies in college admissions.

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Black pain: Mental illness is our dirty little secret

I’m tired, my sisterfriend says. I don’t know how much longer I can hold on. As I hear her I have a couple of choices.

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Fifty years laters, women still get unequal pay for equal work

When John and Ann started working on Jan. 1, 2013, John had an immediate advantage.

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The audacity of voting

I love voting. Every time I go into the booth, I see little girl me, pigtails and all, plaid skirt, white blouse and green sweater, part of my Catholic school uniform. Most of my relatives were Democrats, though my grandmother voted Republican a time or two because “Lincoln freed the slaves.” In 1960, I had the privilege of pulling the lever to elect John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the candidate that the nuns at Immaculate Conception Elementary School rhapsodized over.

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We need an attention span beyond Flight 370

If you missed the news about the disappearance of Malaysian Flight 370 over the Indian Ocean, you must have been buried in sand. For three weeks, we have been bombarded with theories – was it terrorism? Pilot error? Something else? Now the story has evolved.

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Standing on the shoulders of a proud Black feminist

In a world that is dominated by men, especially White men, feminism is, for me, an empowering concept.

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Obama keeps promise to use ‘power of the pen’

During his State of the Union address, President Obama promised to use the power of his pen to achieve the policy objectives that Congress continues to block.

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Celebrating [Black] Women’s History Month

Do you know about Elizabeth Keckley? Maggie Lena Walker, Sarann Knight Preddy, Gertrude Pocte Geddes-Willis, Trish Millines Dziko, Addie L Wyatt or Marie-Therese Metoyer?

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Obama’s legacy, will the good outweigh the bad?

President Barack Obama announced “My Brother’s Keeper,” an initiative to help young Black and Brown men succeed.

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Blacks have more reasons to be fearful than Whites

In the years after enslavement, Southern Whites did all they could to return to a manner of slavery. No White “owned” a Black person, but many Whites behaved as if they did. Theoretically, Blacks were free to come and go as they pleased, but if they went to the wrong store, sat in the wrong part of the bus, or failed to yield narrow sidewalks to Whites, they could expect a physical confrontation.

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Children are collateral damage in war on women

In President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address, he appealed to our nation’s employers to raise wages from the current minimum of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour. He has already signed an executive order that requires federal contractors to be paid $10.10 an hour, an only appropriate move since so many workers on federal contracts are living in poverty.

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Fighting poverty on two fronts, implementing a plan

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Baines Johnson declared a war on poverty.

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My New Year wishes: joy, peace and econoic justice

Happy New Year! Jan. 1 and Jan. 2 are the days when most think of the “new” year, yet with the first Monday in January falling on Jan. 6, that’s probably when most people will return to their desks with focused energy and ready to go.

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Mandela’s road to freedom, human rights

If I close my eyes, I can remember 1984. I am among those running from meeting to meeting working to pass Proposition J, the San Francisco ballot initiative that required the city to divest pension funds from companies doing business in South Africa.

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McBride and other Black women need to be defended

All Renisha McBride wanted to do was to go home. She had been in a car accident, her cellphone was dead, and she needed help.

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Ignorant to history and a slave to slavery comparisons

The brilliant surgeon Dr. Benjamin Carson is out of order and out of control when he compares the Affordable Care Act to slavery. As a physician, he must know how many people lack health care, and how much work this administration had done to right that wrong. As a health advocate, he must have seen those men and women who decide to forego pain medication in favor of something to eat for their children.

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Republicans’ venom aimed at President Barack Obama

At press time, it was unclear whether Congress would finally evade a government shutdown on Oct. 1. I do know, however, that I am sick of the budgetary brinkmanship that plagues our government. Every few months there is some crisis or another that has the House of Representatives and the White House at loggerheads. This time, Republicans in Congress want to defund Obamacare as part of the budget that must be passed and say they are willing to let government close to meet their goal. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid says that Republicans are holding a gun to the American people’s heads, and he isn’t lying.

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The United States has shown it does not care about poor people

When the poverty data was released on Sept. 17, comparing the poverty situation in 2011 to that in 2012, many hoped that poverty levels would drop as an indication of economic good news. But while the gross domestic product has risen, and the wealthy are gaining income, those stuck at the bottom are still simply stuck.

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Congress is eating away at food stamps for those in need

Steven and Laurie, a White married couple that lives near Richmond, Va., work at a big box store. She is a cashier; he works in the storeroom. Each earns about $9 an hour but neither works 40 hours a week. Indeed, they are lucky to pull 40 hours a week combined. Sometimes, they are fortunate enough to pull 45 hours a week between them. Some weeks their combined hours are just 30.

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Obama selling wolf tickets on ‘limited action’ Syria

President Barack Obama stepped on a big limb when he threatened “limited action” against Syria because the country’s leaders allegedly used chemical weapons against their own people. There are international bans against the use of chemical weapons, with Syria one of few countries not supporting the ban. Chemical weapons allegedly killed more than 1,400 Syrians, and the ongoing civil war may have killed as many as 100,000.

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After the March on Washington for jobs and freedom

The 1963 March on Washington was a pivotal moment for African Americans, a day when people joined to fight for jobs, peace and justice. More than 250,000 people traveled to Washington, coming by busses, trains and occasionally planes.

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Russell Simmons violates Harriet Tubman with a sex tape parody

Every time I hear the voice of Russell Simmons, I hear a cool, clean, clear meditative voice, especially on Twitter where he drops his yoga knowledge in a reflective way. I guess he wasn’t folding his legs and saying a centered “Om” when he decided to ridicule an African woman. How did his voice distort itself to decide that he would post a YouTube video on a space where everybody could watch a so-called parody of Harriet Tubman having sex with her White slavemaster with the intent of filming it and blackmailing him? How could he, this forward-focused man, decide to demean an emancipation heroine? Choose to demean her by making her a sexual object? Even as he took the offensive tape off his website, please tell me, somebody, what Simmons was thinking? (In my first draft of this column, I called this man a “brother,” but really I mean the brother from another mindset.)

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Dropping the leadership baton of the civil right struggle

Research shows that this generation of young people, no matter their race, are likely to do less well than their parents did. Shackled by a trillion dollars worth of student loans and a flat labor market, the New York-based Demos organization says the student loan burden prevents young people from buying homes and amassing wealth. While there are some racial gaps, many young people enter the labor market already behind the space their parents occupied.

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What is a living wage? Economic debate over minimum wage

Last week, workers at fast food restaurants demonstrated outside their places of work, highlighting the low wages they receive and demanding more. They say twice as much, or $15 an hour, will provide them with a living wage. In Washington, D.C., the City Council has sent legislation to Mayor Vincent Gray requiring “big box” stores such as WalMart and Best Buy to pay $12.50, which is more than the D.C. minimum wage of $8.25 an hour. In response, WalMart says it may not build all of the six stores it had slated for D.C. Responses depend on whom you talk to, with some of the unemployed saying that an $8.25 job is better than no job, and others saying that $8.25 is not a living wage.

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Student loan ‘solution’ is not good enough

The United States Senate finally stepped up to ensure that student loan rates would not double. There have been weeks of back and forth, but now senators says they will tie student loan rates to the federal funds rate, which means that in the short-run the lowest student loan rates will be 3.86 percent, up slightly from 3.4 percent. The bad news is that these loan rates may rise up to a rate of 8.25 percent, depending on prevailing interest rates. All other loan rates, including those for graduate student, for Parent PLUS loans, and others, will rise as well.

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What African Americans can learn from South Africa

Nelson Mandela turned 95 years old on July 18. He has been hospitalized for more than a month, and the world holds its breath as we witness the decline of the lion that roared for freedom in South Africa. Mandela’s insistence and persistence for freedom for Black South Africans, which included a 27-year jail sentence, reminds us of the persistence it takes to make structural and institutional change.

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Looking beyond George Zimmerman, the trial

Trayvon Martin might not be dead except for the fact that George Zimmerman carried a gun and acted as a wanna-be policeman. Rev. Al Sharpton and others deserve props for rallying people and insisting that Zimmerman be brought to trial. Anytime a gun goes off, I think somebody has to go to trial, simply to ensure that their actions be accounted for. Zimmerman was found not guilty, but at least he has been made somewhat accountable for his actions.

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Limiting women’s right to choose is a step backward

I was 20 years old when Roe v. Wade was decided. A year before the decision, a young woman who lived in my dormitory attempted an abortion on herself and hemorrhaged so badly that she was hospitalized. I’ll never forget the blood on the floor of her room, and the anguished screams of her roommate.

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Health disparities: A function of assets, access and attitudes

Last week, I attended a “think tank” conversation with leaders of the Rodham Institute, a newly established center at George Washington University, who are dedicated to reducing health disparities in Washington, D.C. This is an important effort because Washington is such a divided city. East of the Anacostia River – Wards 7 and 8 – are the poorest areas in the district, with some of the most challenging problems. They have an obesity rate of more than 40 percent, which is more than the national average, and more than the extremely poor state of Mississippi. There are food deserts east of the river, where it is easier to get potato chips than an apple or banana. While there are rudimentary hospitals and health centers, most referrals to a specialist will likely require a Ward 7 or 8 resident to take an expensive taxi ride across the river. This city is rife with health disparities.

Is the recovery stumbling or is it soaring?

Although the overall unemployment rate still exceeds 7 percent, and the official Black unemployment rate is greater than 13 percent, there are some who insist that there is a robust economic recovery in progress. Indeed, we were declared “post-recession” in 2011, based on the definition of recovery as GDP growth for three quarters in a row. The perception of whether the recovery is stumbling or soaring depends on your own financial status. White and Asian households headed by those age 40-61 and have a two- or four-year degree recovered all but 2 percent of their wealth by 2012. Similarly situated African American and Hispanic households had just 58.7 percent of the wealth they had at the beginning of the recession. Wealth recovery depends on race, pre-recession portfolio (which speaks to the racial wealth gap), home value, stocks (the wealthier are more likely to hold stocks than others), savings (lower for African Americans) and debt (higher for African Americans).

In job creation, we’re in a race to the bottom

On May 21, I had the opportunity to testify before a Congressional Progressive Caucus meeting on how federal dollars drive inequality by paying contractors who pay too many of their workers too little. The hearing was driven by a study from Amy Traub and her colleagues at Demos, a New York-based think tank, that issued a report exposing the many ways that federal contracting often adds to the burden of the low income, especially those who earn less than $12 an hour, or less than $25,000 a year.

Our colleges: Placing athletics above academics

Why do sports play such a prominent role in college education? Does it crowd out the attention we pay to other aspects of college life? Why are student athletes treated like slaves or gladiators, playing to pay colleges for the fruits of their labor? Other students enjoy “school spirit” when their team wins, and universities collect revenue from advertisers when they make it to the big leagues.

Black empowerment in American … at last – or just last?

When Beyonce Knowles sang the Etta James song At Last at President Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration, the song could have had several meanings. At last we have an African American president? At last, the muscle of the Black vote has been flexed? At last, there is some hope for our country to come together with the mantra “Yes, we can.”

Blacks underrepresented in immigration debate

The Senate’s Gang of Eight have put together an 844-page monstrosity known as the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act, legislation that President Obama says he “basically approves” of. The crafters of this essentially unreadable bill was put together by senators Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Robert Menendez, D-N.J., Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., Michael Bennett, D-Col., Marco Rubio, R-Fla., Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., John McCain, R-Ariz., and Lindsay Graham, R-S.C.

Learning to teach students how to learn

African American students achieve at a different level than White students. Test scores are lower, as are high school and college completion rates, and the number of African Americans attending four-year institutions is falling. The rate of African American suspensions and expulsions from K-12 schools is higher than that of other groups. By almost any metric there are gaps between African American students and White or Asian students (Latinos achieve at about the same rate as African Americans).

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When in doubt, blame a dark-skinned man

(NNPA) – I don’t know where CNN’s John King got the information that a suspect in the Boston bombing was “a dark-skinned male,” but beyond apologizing, he needs to explain himself. How many sources gave him the false tip? If it was fewer than two, then he violated a basic journalism rule. Who were these sources (if you don’t want to out them publicly, tell your editor)? Did King understand that he used the kind of racial/ethnic coding that once got people, even uninvolved and innocent people, lynched?

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Right wing uses ‘Obama’ as a prefix for positive change

The right wing seems determined to associate President Barack Obama with any government program that helps people on the bottom. Thus, the term Obamacare was used to attack the health care program that Obama fashioned and worked with Congress to approve. While Obamacare is not perfect, it brings more people into the health care system, and further solidifies the safety net that many have attempted to fray.

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The burden of unemployment. Who will fix it? Who will pay?

(NNPA) - Unemployment rates were “little changed” in March 2013 – they were either holding steady or dropping by a tenth of a percentage point or so. The unemployment rate dropped from 7.7 to 7.6 percent representing a steady, if painstakingly slow, decrease. This declining unemployment rate was reported with some circumspection because even as the rate dropped, nearly half a million people left the labor market, presumably because they could not find work. Further, in March, the economy generated a scant 88,000 jobs, fewer than in any of the prior nine months. An economy that many enjoy, describing as “recovering,” has not yet recovered enough to generate enough jobs to keep up with population increases.

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U.S. and Europe, not the Catholic Church, blowing smoke

The selection of Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio as the next leader of the Catholic Church was, in some ways, inevit le. Latin America is home to the largest Catholic population in the world, and it has been more than past time for the tradition of selecting European popes to end. Hopefully, Bergoglio, to be known as Pope Francis, will be able to stem the tide of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church as well as put the church on the path of more transparency and integrity. Proposals to allow women to be priests and to allow married priests into the clergy are, for Catholics, revolutionary ways to modernize the church. Francis, who brings a reputation of frugality and humility to the church, may well be able to deal with these proposals.