New COVID subvariants emerge as city monitors closely

Jheison Romain Nieto – Photo courtesy of social media

By OBASE-WOTTA KAMMONKE
The Dallas Examiner

 

With COVID-19 cases still looming large in various cities, there is increased concern over new strains and variants. Current risk level of COVID-19 in Dallas is at yellow, as the Center for Disease Control and Prevention has urged people across the country to proceed carefully. It has also encouraged the use of masks in especially in public settings.

The Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation recently released new information about the Omicron subvariant XBB.1.5. It believes it is spreading quickly across the U.S.

“We are likely to see another month of higher average arrivals to emergency departments and hospitalizations in Dallas County,” Parkland asserted in a recent press release.

The county recently reported over 703,000 cumulative cases and an average of 582 cases daily, according to DallasCounty.org. African Americans make up 18.6% of those cases.

It also reported 6,808 cumulative COVID deaths.

Jheison Romain, program coordinator for Dallas County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins stated that Dallas County will continue to inform constituents daily regarding the level of COVID-19 risk in the community.

“Dallas County also continues to encourage residents to ensure they are up-to-date with their COVID-19 vaccines and boosters, including the bivalent booster that provides additional protection against Omicron variants of COVID-19,” Romain said. “Residents who receive any of their COVID-19 shots at Dallas County immunization clinics or pop-up clinics will receive $25 gift cards to Walmart when they receive their vaccines.”

Romain advised individuals who have contracted the disease to take extra precautions, in order to avoid spreading it.

“Residents who feel sick should stay home if they can or wear a high-quality KN95 or N95 mask when around others to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses with high levels of spread, such as flu and RSV,” he said.

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